6295 Dawson Creek Lane​ , Arlington  TN 38002                                    704-517-7418                                                                                 juliejohnsonviolin@gmail.com

Johnson Violin Studio is a home studio. As you can see our home is currently being built in the Wilson's Crossing neighborhood in Arlington, TN. The house will be done at the beginning of November. In the meantime, I will be teaching in our apartment at the corner of Airline Rd. and Milton Wilson Blvd. just a couple of minutes away.

The core of learning any musical instrument should be a one-on-one weekly lesson. I have taught students from 3 years old to students in their 70s. I have had several students go on to be music majors in college and some who just want to be able to play regularly at their church, and everything in between. 


I have 18 years of experience in the Suzuki Method as well as traditional teaching. How closely I stick to the Suzuki Method depends on the strengths and challenges of each student and that student's goals. I want  my students to be able to play excellently, to be able to read music well, and to have a lifelong love of music. Each student reaches these goals in different ways. 


I tailor my approach to teaching according to each individual student's needs and what they intend to do with the violin. A person wanting to major in music in college should have a different experience than a person who wants to be able to play in the worship team at their church.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Suzuki Method and do you use it?

The Suzuki Method is a way of teaching the violin that was developed by Dr. Shinichi Suzuki in the mid 20th century. He noticed that every child learns how to speak their own native language and he believed that everyone could learn music the same way. He called his method the mother tongue approach.

The basis of my teaching is the Suzuki Method. With a young beginner student, I will stick closely to the Suzuki Method, then add traditional repertoire and techniques as needed by each individual student as they advance.

What age do you teach?

I have had students as young as 3 years old. The ideal starting age depends on each child’s personality and maturity level. I have also had many adult students.

How long are lessons?

Lessons are 30, 45 or 60 minutes depending on the level of the student. Beginner students are usually 30 minutes.

Do you help students with orchestra music and auditions?

Absolutely. I want any student of mine to be prepared for every rehearsal, performance and audition.

How long should a student practice?

Practice time depends on the level of the student. I ask for an absolute minimum of 15 minutes a day for 5 days a week for a beginner. This goes up as the student advances.

Do you teach country or irish fiddling?

I will occasionally add songs outside of the classical repertoire including fiddle tunes, Disney songs, movie themes and popular music. These are always in addition to standard repertoire. Classical training gives students the ability to play any type of music that they wish.

What are your rates?

My rates are $28 for a 30 minute lesson, $42 for a 45 minute lesson, and $56 for a 60 minute lesson.

What is your payment and cancellation policy?

Payment is due at the first lesson of each month and is for the entire month in advance. I typically don’t teach more than four lessons in a month.

Each student is entitled to one scheduled missed lesson each semester and one sick day (as needed) each semester.  A scheduled missed lesson must be arranged in advance at the first lesson of the month when payment is made.  I cannot refund for any missed lessons that go beyond the allowances above.  However, I will try to offer an alternate time to make up lessons whenever possible.


A more detailed studio policy can be downloaded by clicking on 

"I have 18 years of experience in the Suzuki Method as well as traditional teaching. How closely I stick to the Suzuki Method depends on the strengths and challenges of each student and that student's goals. I want  my students to be able to play excellently, to be able to read music well, and to have a lifelong love of music. Each student reaches these goals in different ways."